COVID-19 Notification

During this challenging time in the medical community, our utmost priority is to care for and protect our patients. We plan to remain open and provide retina care to our community. We are following the CDC and American Academy of Ophthalmology’s recommendations regarding disinfection, infection control, and social distancing guidelines in all of our offices. All patients must wear a mask while in our office. If a patient does not have a mask, a mask will be given to them. To protect our patients and staff, we ask that patients with the following symptoms or situations contact our office prior to their appointment to see if they can keep their current appointment:

  • Patients who have traveled internationally, gone on a cruise, or traveled outside of their state or immediate area within the last 14 days
  • Patients who have visited, worked, or been institutionalized in a nursing home, long-term care facility, hospital, or rehab facility within the last 14 days
  • Patients who have been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19 within the last 14 days
  • Patients with fever, flu-like symptoms, headache, diarrhea, stomach pain, loss of taste/smell, congestion, sore throat, fatigue, body aches, new-onset cough, conjunctivitis (pink eye), or new-onset shortness of breath

For patients with urgent eye conditions who meet the above-mentioned criteria, we will examine and treat them in an isolated space in our office if needed.

Visitor Policy: We currently are prohibiting visitors from our clinics with the exception of visitors accompanying patients with decreased mental capacity or extreme physical impairments. All visitors must also meet the above-mentioned, travel restriction and illness criteria to stay in our office with a patient. Visitors not meeting the previously mentioned criteria must wait outside our office until the patient exits the building, and unfortunately at this time, they may not wait in our office or waiting areas. In addition, we will not allow anyone under the age of 16 in our offices.

Pursuant to the Order of the Kanawha Charleston Health Department, dated April 6, 2020, the maximum per person occupancy in our Charleston office is 20 people. While in our office, a social distance of 6 feet must always be maintained.

As always, we appreciate your understanding and support during this ever-changing, healthcare climate.

Patient Resources


Retina Consultants is committed to providing our patient and caregivers access to the latest information on the conditions we serve. To see additional information on the conditions we serve, please visit our YouTube channel.

Dry AMD

Flash and Floaters


Wet AMD Medication Injection

Diabetic PDR Laser


Check our YouTube channel for more information »


What is a Retina Specialist?

A retina specialist is a medical doctor who has specialized in ophthalmology and sub-specialized in diseases and surgery of the vitreous body of the eye and the retina. Read more

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

(AMD) is a deterioration of the retina and choroid that leads to a substantial loss in visual acuity (sharpness of vision). Read more

Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

Retinal vein occlusions occur when there is a blockage of veins carrying blood with needed oxygen and nutrients to the nerve cells in the retina. Read more

Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

Central retinal vein occlusion, also known as CRVO, is a condition in which the main vein that drains blood from the retina closes off partially or completely. This can cause blurred vision and other problems with the eye. Read more

Macular Edema

Central retinal vein occlusion, also known as CRVO, is a condition in which the main vein that drains blood from the retina closes off partially or completely. Read more

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy (pronounced ret in OP uh thee) is a complication of diabetes that causes damage to the blood vessels of the retina— the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back part of the eye, allowing you to see fine detail. Read more

Intravitreal Injections

An intravitreal (pronounced in tra VIT re al) injection is a procedure to place a medication directly into the space in the back of the eye called the vitreous cavity, which is filled with a jelly-like fluid called the vitreous humor gel. Read more

Retinal Detachment

The retina lines the back wall of the eye, and is responsible for absorbing the light that enters the eye and converting it into an electrical signal that is sent to the brain via the optic nerve, allowing you to see. Read more

Macular Hole

The macula is a small area in the center of the retina where light is sharply focused to produce the detailed color vision needed for tasks such as reading and driving. When a full-thickness defect develops in the macula, the condition is referred to as macular hole. Read more

Vitrectomy

Vitrectomy is a surgical procedure undertaken by a specialist where the vitreous humor gel that fills the eye cavity is removed to provide better access to the retina. This allows for a variety of repairs, including the removal of scar tissue, laser repair of retinal detachments and treatment of macular holes. Read more at National Eye Institute

Our Locations

For after hour Emergencies, Call our Charleston Office 304.346.4400